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Ulrika Ericson

Ulrika Ericson

Associate professor

Ulrika Ericson

Identification of Inflammatory and Disease-Associated Plasma Proteins that Associate with Intake of Added Sugar and Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Their Role in Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Author

  • Stina Ramne
  • Isabel Drake
  • Ulrika Ericson
  • Jan Nilsson
  • Marju Orho-Melander
  • Gunnar Engström
  • Emily Sonestedt

Summary, in English

It has been suggested that high intake of added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increase the level of circulating inflammatory proteins and that chronic inflammation plays a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. We aim to examine how added sugar and SSB intake associate with 136 measured plasma proteins and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the Malmö Diet and Cancer-Cardiovascular Cohort (n = 4382), and examine if the identified added sugar- and SSB-associated proteins associate with T2D incidence. A two-step iterative resampling approach was used to internally replicate proteins that associated with added sugar and SSB intake. Nine proteins were identified to associate with added sugar intake, of which only two associated with T2D incidence (p < 0.00045). Seven proteins were identified to associate with SSB intake, of which six associated strongly with T2D incidence (p < 6.9 × 10-8). No significant associations were observed between added sugar and SSB intake and CRP concentrations. In summary, our elucidation of the relationship between plasma proteome and added sugar and SSB intake, in relation to future T2D risk, demonstrated that SSB intake, rather than the total intake of added sugar, was related to a T2D-pathological proteomic signature. However, external replication is needed to verify the findings.

Department/s

  • Nutrition Epidemiology
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • Diabetes - Cardiovascular Disease
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health
  • Cardiovascular Research - Immunity and Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular Research - Epidemiology

Publishing year

2020-10-14

Language

English

Publication/Series

Nutrients

Volume

12

Issue

10

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

MDPI AG

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Nutrition Epidemiology
  • Diabetes - Cardiovascular Disease
  • Cardiovascular Research - Immunity and Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular Research - Epidemiology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 2072-6643