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Tanja Stocks

Tanja Stocks

Project manager

Tanja Stocks

Change in proportional protein intake in a 10-week energy-restricted low- or high-fat diet, in relation to changes in body size and metabolic factors

Author

  • Tanja Stocks
  • Moira A. Taylor
  • Lars Ängquist
  • Ian A. Macdonald
  • Peter Arner
  • Claus Holst
  • Jean Michel Oppert
  • J. Alfredo Martinez
  • Stephan Rössner
  • Jan Polak
  • Dominique Langin
  • Wim H.M. Saris
  • Arne Astrup
  • Thorkild I.A. Sørensen

Summary, in English

Objective: To investigate in a secondary analysis of a randomised trial the effects of a low-/high-fat diet and reported change from baseline in energy% from protein (prot%), in relation to changes in body size and metabolic factors. Methods: Obese adults (n = 771) were randomised to a 600 kcal energy-deficient low-fat (20-25 fat%) or high-fat (40-45 fat%) diet over 10 weeks. Dietary intake data at baseline and during the intervention were available in 585 completers. We used linear regression to calculate the combined effects of randomised group and groups of prot% change (<-2 /-2 to 2/>2) on outcomes. Results: The low-fat group with >2 prot% increase lost 1.1 kg more weight (p = 0.03) and reduced cholesterol by 0.25 mmol/l more (p = 0.003) than the high-fat group with >2 prot% decrease. These differences were 2.5-fold and 1.8-fold greater than the differences between the low-fat and high-fat groups while not considering prot% change. The high-fat group reduced plasma triglycerides more than the low-fat group, but not compared to those in the low-fat group with >2 units prot% increase (p fat-protein interaction = 0.01). Conclusions: Under energy restriction, participants on a low-fat diet who had increased the percentage energy intake from protein showed the greatest reduction in weight and cholesterol, and a triglyceride reduction equally large to that of participants on a high-fat diet.

Department/s

  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2013-06-01

Language

English

Pages

217-227

Publication/Series

Obesity Facts

Volume

6

Issue

3

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Karger

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Keywords

  • Blood glucose
  • Dietary fats
  • Dietary proteins
  • Lipids
  • Obesity

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1662-4025