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Tanja Stocks

Tanja Stocks

Researcher

Tanja Stocks

Metabolic risk factors and cervical cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can)

Author

  • Hanno Ulmer
  • Tone Bjorge
  • Hans Concin
  • Annekatrin Lukanova
  • Jonas Manjer
  • Goran Hallmans
  • Wegene Borena
  • Christel Haggstrom
  • Anders Engeland
  • Martin Almquist
  • Hakan Jonsson
  • Randi Selmer
  • Par Stattin
  • Steinar Tretli
  • Andrea Kleiner
  • Tanja Stocks
  • Gabriele Nagel

Summary, in English

Background. Little is known about the association between metabolic risk factors and cervical cancer carcinogenesis. Material and methods. During mean follow-up of 11 years of the Me-Can cohort (N = 288,834) 425 invasive cervical cancer cases were diagnosed. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by the use of Cox proportional hazards regression models for quintiles and standardized z-scores (with a mean of 0 and a SD of 1) of BMI, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS score. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurements. Results. BMI (per 1SD increment) was associated with 12%, increase of cervical cancer risk, blood pressure with 25% and triglycerides with 39%, respectively. In models including all metabolic factors, the associations for blood pressure and triglycerides persisted. The metabolic syndrome (MetS) score was associated with 26% increased corrected risk of cervical cancer. Triglycerides were stronger associated with squamous cell carcinoma (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83) than with adenocarcinoma (0.92, 0.54-1.56). Among older women cholesterol (50-70 years 1.34; 1.00-1.81), triglycerides (50-70 years 1.49, 1.03-2.16 and >= 70 years 1.54, 1.09-2.19) and glucose (>= 70 years 1.87, 1.13-3.11) were associated with increased cervical cancer risk. Conclusion. The presence of obesity, elevated blood pressure and triglycerides were associated with increased risk of cervical cancer. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Department/s

  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health
  • Surgery

Publishing year

2012

Language

English

Pages

330-335

Publication/Series

Gynecologic Oncology

Volume

125

Issue

2

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Academic Press

Topic

  • Surgery

Keywords

  • Metabolic factors
  • Cervical cancer
  • Epidemiology
  • CONOR

Status

Published

Research group

  • Surgery

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1095-6859