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Simon Timpka

Research team manager

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Knee extensor strength and body weight in adolescent men and the risk of knee osteoarthritis by middle age

Author

  • Aleksandra Turkiewicz
  • Simon Timpka
  • Jonas Bloch Thorlund
  • Eva Ageberg
  • Martin Englund

Summary, in English

OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age.

METHODS: We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data on isometric knee extensor strength, weight, height, smoking, alcohol consumption, parental education and adult occupation from Swedish registries. We identified participants diagnosed with knee OA or knee injury from 1987 to 2010 through the National Patient Register. We estimated the HR of knee OA using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional regression model. To assess the influence of adult knee injury and occupation, we performed a formal mediation analysis.

RESULTS: The mean (SD) knee extensor strength was 234 (47) Nm, the mean (SD) weight was 66 (9.3) kg. During 24 years (median) of follow-up starting at the age of 35 years, 2049 persons were diagnosed with knee OA. The adjusted HR (95% CI) of incident knee OA was 1.12 (1.06 to 1.18) for each SD of knee extensor strength and 1.18 (1.15 to 1.21) per 5 kg of body weight. Fifteen per cent of the increase in OA risk due to higher knee extensor strength could be attributed to knee injury and adult occupation.

CONCLUSION: Higher knee extensor strength in adolescent men was associated with increased risk of knee OA by middle age, challenging the current tenet of low muscle strength being a risk factor for OA. We confirmed higher weight to be a strong risk factor for knee OA.

Department/s

  • Lund OsteoArthritis Division - Clinical Epidemiology Unit
  • Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology
  • Sport Sciences
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2017-10-01

Language

English

Pages

1657-1661

Publication/Series

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

Volume

76

Issue

10

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

BMJ Publishing Group

Topic

  • Orthopedics

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • knee osteoarthritis
  • osteoarthritis

Status

Published

Research group

  • Lund OsteoArthritis Division - Clinical Epidemiology Unit
  • Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology
  • Sport Sciences

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1468-2060