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Paul Franks

Paul Franks

Principal investigator

Paul Franks

Infant Body Composition and Adipokine Concentrations in Relation to Maternal Gestational Weight Gain.

Author

  • Angela Estampador
  • Jeremy Pomeroy
  • Frida Renström
  • Scott M Nelson
  • Ingrid Mogren
  • Margareta Persson
  • Naveed Sattar
  • Magnus Domellöf
  • Paul Franks

Summary, in English

OBJECTIVETo investigate associations of maternal gestational weight gain and body composition and their impact on offspring body composition and adipocytokine, glucose, and insulin concentrations at age 4 months.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThis was a prospective study including 31 mother-infant pairs (N = 62). Maternal body composition was assessed using doubly labeled water. Infant body composition was assessed at 4 months using air displacement plethysmography, and venous blood was assayed for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and leptin concentrations.RESULTSRate of gestational weight gain in midpregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat mass (r = 0.41, P = 0.03); rate of gestational weight in late pregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat-free mass (r = 0.37, P = 0.04). Infant birth weight was also strongly correlated with infant fat-free mass at 4 months (r = 0.63, P = 0.0002). Maternal BMI and maternal fat mass were strongly inversely associated with infant IL-6 concentrations (r = -0.60, P = 0.002 and r = -0.52, P = 0.01, respectively). Infant fat-free mass was inversely related to infant adiponectin concentrations (r = -0.48, P = 0.008) and positively correlated with infant blood glucose adjusted for insulin concentrations (r = 0.42, P = 0.04). No significant associations for leptin were observed.CONCLUSIONSTiming of maternal weight gain differentially impacts body composition of the 4-month-old infant, which in turn appears to affect the infant's glucose and adipokine concentrations.

Department/s

  • Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2014

Language

English

Pages

1432-1438

Publication/Series

Diabetes Care

Volume

37

Issue

5

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

American Diabetes Association

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1935-5548