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Olle Melander

Principal investigator

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SNPs related to vitamin D and breast cancer risk : A case-control study

Author

  • Linnea Huss
  • Salma Tunå Butt
  • Peter Almgren
  • Signe Borgquist
  • Jasmine Brandt
  • Asta Försti
  • Olle Melander
  • Jonas Manjer

Summary, in English

Background: It has been suggested that vitamin D might protect from breast cancer, although studies on levels of vitamin D in association with breast cancer have been inconsistent. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be associated with vitamin D. The aim of this study was to investigate such vitamin D-SNP associations in relation to subsequent breast cancer risk. A first step included verification of these SNPs as determinants of vitamin D levels. Methods: The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study included 17,035 women in a prospective cohort. Genotyping was performed and was successful in 4058 nonrelated women from this cohort in which 865 were diagnosed with breast cancer. Levels of vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) were available for 700 of the breast cancer cases and 643 of unaffected control subjects. SNPs previously associated with vitamin D in GWASs were identified. Logistic regression analyses yielding ORs with 95% CIs were performed to investigate selected SNPs in relation to low levels of vitamin D (below median) as well as to the risk of breast cancer. Results: The majority of SNPs previously associated with levels of vitamin D showed a statistically significant association with circulating vitamin D levels. Heterozygotes of one SNP (rs12239582) were found to have a statistically significant association with a low risk of breast cancer (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68-0.99), and minor homozygotes of the same SNP were found to have a tendency towards a low risk of being in the group with low vitamin D levels (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.52-1.00). Results from stratified analyses showed diverse associations with breast cancer risk for a few of the tested SNPs, depending on whether vitamin D level was high or low. Conclusions: SNPs associated with vitamin D may also be associated with the risk of breast cancer. Even if such a risk is small, the allele frequency of the SNP variants is high, and therefore the population attributable risk could be substantial. It is also possible that vitamin D levels may interact with genomic traits with regard to breast cancer risk.

Department/s

  • Surgery
  • Diabetes - Cardiovascular Disease
  • Tumor microenvironment
  • Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology
  • Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2018-01-02

Language

English

Publication/Series

Breast Cancer Research

Volume

20

Issue

1

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

BioMed Central (BMC)

Topic

  • Cancer and Oncology

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Polymorphism
  • SNP
  • Vitamin D

Status

Published

Research group

  • Surgery
  • Diabetes - Cardiovascular Disease
  • Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1465-5411