Your browser has javascript turned off or blocked. This will lead to some parts of our website to not work properly or at all. Turn on javascript for best performance.

The browser you are using is not supported by this website. All versions of Internet Explorer are no longer supported, either by us or Microsoft (read more here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/windows/end-of-ie-support).

Please use a modern browser to fully experience our website, such as the newest versions of Edge, Chrome, Firefox or Safari etc.

Default user image.

Olle Melander

Principal investigator

Default user image.

Increased mortality among acute respiratory distress patients from immigrant dense urban districts

Author

  • Torgny Wessman
  • Rafid Tofik
  • Klas Gränsbo
  • Olle Melander

Summary, in English

Purpose: This study investigated whether living in immigrant dense urban districts (IDUDs) and low-income areas in the city of Malmö predicted 5-year mortality among patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) because of acute respiratory distress. Patients and methods: We randomly selected 184 patients with acute respiratory distress during 2007, visiting the ED at Skåne University Hospital, Malmö. In 2007, Malmö had 36% first- and second-generation immigrants. The main exposure was defined as being resident in any of the five IDUDs of Malmö compared to being resident in the five districts of Malmö with the highest proportion of Sweden-born inhabitants (SDUDs). We recorded vital parameters; medical triage priority according to Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT), ICD-10 diagnoses, and the mean annual income for the patient’s urban district. We examined 5-year mortality risk using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: After adjustment for age and gender, patients from IDUDs (n=100, 54%) had an HR (95% CI) of 1.65 (1.087-2.494; P=0.019) regarding mortality at 5-year follow-up. Patients in the lowest vs highest income quartile had an HR of 2.00 (1.06-3.79; P=0.032) regarding mortality at 5-year follow-up. Age, male gender, presence of cardiopulmonary disease, and ADAPT priority also independently predicted the 5-year mortality. The excess risk of 5-year mortality associated with living in IDUDs remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, ADAPT priority, presence of cardiopulmonary disease, and income with an HR of 1.79 (1.15-2.78; P=0.010). Conclusion: Living in an IDUD is a strong independent risk factor for 5-year mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress. The cause is unknown. Our study suggests a need for better structured follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease in such patients.

Department/s

  • Cardiovascular Research - Hypertension
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2019-03-11

Language

English

Pages

43-49

Publication/Series

Open Access Emergency Medicine

Volume

11

Issue

2019

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Dove Medical Press Ltd.

Topic

  • Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems

Keywords

  • ADAPT
  • Dyspnea
  • Emergency department
  • Income
  • Mortality
  • Socioeconomic

Status

Published

Research group

  • Cardiovascular Research - Hypertension

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1179-1500