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Kerstin Berntorp

Kerstin Berntorp

Adjunct professor

Kerstin Berntorp

Perceptions of diabetes control among people with type 2 diabetes treated with basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom

Author

  • Meryl Brod
  • Kathryn M. Pfeiffer
  • Anthony H. Barnett
  • Kerstin Berntorp
  • Tina Vilsbøll
  • Benno Weissenberger

Summary, in English

Objective: To investigate perceptions of control among people with uncontrolled and well controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with basal insulin, as well as differences in perceptions and diabetes management practices between the two groups. Research design and methods: Web surveys of 1012 people with uncontrolled T2D (HbA1c >8.0% or 64 mmol/mol) on basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK and 295 people with well controlled T2D (HbA1c 1c value (78.9%), times per day insulin taken (78.8%), insulin units taken per day (77.6%), and energy levels (74.5%). Fifty-one percent of uncontrolled respondents considered the past week or more recently when thinking about control. Perceived major obstacles to control included stress (75.4%), other health issues (70.8%), medicine side effects (69.9%), food cravings (69.8%), doctor not understanding individual situation (67.6%), and life crises (66.9%). Many uncontrolled respondents reported that diabetes was very/extremely interfering with their lives, including energy level (71.0%), performance at work (70.0%), general health (69.9%), and doing what one wants (69.3%). Analyses showed significant differences between well controlled and uncontrolled UK respondents. Compared to the uncontrolled, people with well controlled T2D were significantly more likely to consider the last 24 hours/current time when thinking about control (50% vs. 21%, p

Department/s

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

Publishing year

2016-10-02

Language

English

Pages

1653-1661

Publication/Series

Current Medical Research and Opinion

Volume

32

Issue

10

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

LibraPharm

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Keywords

  • Diabetes control
  • Diabetes management
  • Perceptions of control
  • Type 2 diabetes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 0300-7995