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Kerstin Berntorp

Kerstin Berntorp

Adjunct professor

Kerstin Berntorp

Screening for MODY mutations, GAD antibodies, and type 1 diabetes--associated HLA genotypes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

Author

  • Jianping Weng
  • Magnus Ekelund
  • Markku Lehto
  • Haiyan Li
  • Göran Ekberg
  • Anders Frid
  • Anders E Åberg
  • Leif Groop
  • Kerstin Berntorp

Summary, in English

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes or maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) increases susceptibility to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied mutations in MODY1-4 genes, the presence of GAD antibodies, and HLA DQB1 risk genotypes in 66 Swedish women with GDM and a family history of diabetes. An oral glucose tolerance test was repeated in 46 women at 1 year postpartum. RESULTS: There was no increase in type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQB1 alleles or GAD antibodies when compared with a group of type 2 diabetic patients (n = 82) or healthy control subjects (n = 86). Mutations in known MODY genes were identified in 3 of the 66 subjects (1 MODY2, 1 MODY3, and 1 MODY4). Of the 46 GDM subjects, 2 had diabetes (4%) and 17 had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (37%) at 1 year postpartum. Of the two subjects who developed manifest diabetes, one carried a MODY3 mutation (A203H in the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha gene). There was no increase in high-risk HLA alleles or GAD antibodies in the women who had manifest diabetes or IGT at 1 year postpartum. CONCLUSIONS: MODY mutations but not autoimmunity contribute to GDM in Swedish women with a family history of diabetes and increase the risk of subsequent diabetes.

Department/s

  • Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Lund)
  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

Publishing year

2002

Language

English

Pages

68-71

Publication/Series

Diabetes Care

Volume

25

Issue

1

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

American Diabetes Association

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Keywords

  • Diabetes Mellitus Non-Insulin-Dependent : genetics
  • Diabetes Gestational : genetics : immunology
  • Female
  • Support Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Sweden
  • Risk Assessment
  • Pregnancy
  • Patient Selection
  • Mutation
  • Middle Age
  • Human
  • HLA Antigens : genetics
  • HLA-DQ Antigens : genetics
  • Genotype
  • Glucose Intolerance : genetics : immunology
  • Adult
  • Diabetes Mellitus Insulin-Dependent : genetics : immunology

Status

Published

Research group

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1935-5548