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Karl-Fredrik Eriksson

Associate professor

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Relationship between testosterone levels, insulin sensitivity, and mitochondrial function in men

Author

  • N Pitteloud
  • VK Mootha
  • AA Dwyer
  • M Hardin
  • H Lee
  • Karl-Fredrik Eriksson
  • Devjit Tripathy
  • M Yialamas
  • Leif Groop
  • D Elahi
  • FJ Hayes

Summary, in English

OBJECTIVE - The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between serum testosterone levels and insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function in men, RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 60 men (mean age 60.5 +/- 1.2 years) had a detailed hormonal and metabolic evaluation. Insulin sensitivity was measured Using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Mitochondrial function was assessed by measuring maximal aerobic capacity (Vo(2max)) and expression of oxidative phosphorylation gene,, in skeletal muscle, RESULTS - A total of 45% of subjects had normal glucose tolerance, 20% had impaired glucose tolerance, and 35% had type 2 diabetes. Testosterone levels were correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = 0.4, P < 0.005). Subjects with hypogonadal testosterone levels (n = 10) had a BMI > 25 kg/m(2) and a threefold higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome than their eugonadal counterparts (n = 50) this relationship held true after adjusting for age and sex hormone-binding globulin but not BMI. Testosterone levels also correlated with (Vo(2max),11 0 = 0.43, P < 0.05) and oxidative phosphorylation gene expression (r = 0.57, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS - These data indicate that low serum testosterone levels are associated with an adverse metabolic profile and suggest a novel unifying mechanism for the previously independent observations that low testosterone levels and impaired mitochondrial function promote insulin resistance in men.

Department/s

  • Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö
  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

Publishing year

2005

Language

English

Pages

1636-1642

Publication/Series

Diabetes Care

Volume

28

Issue

7

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

American Diabetes Association

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1935-5548