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ludc web

Joao Duarte

Principal investigator

ludc web

Activatable MRI probes for the specific detection of bacteria

Author

  • Prabu Periyathambi
  • Alien Balian
  • Zhangjun Hu
  • Daniel Padro
  • Luiza I. Hernandez
  • Kajsa Uvdal
  • Joao Duarte
  • Frank J. Hernandez

Summary, in English

Activatable fluorescent probes have been successfully used as molecular tools for biomedical research in the last decades. Fluorescent probes allow the detection of molecular events, providing an extraordinary platform for protein and cellular research. Nevertheless, most of the fluorescent probes reported are susceptible to interferences from endogenous fluorescence (background signal) and limited tissue penetration is expected. These drawbacks prevent the use of fluorescent tracers in the clinical setting. To overcome the limitation of fluorescent probes, we and others have developed activatable magnetic resonance probes. Herein, we report for the first time, an oligonucleotide-based probe with the capability to detect bacteria using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The activatable MRI probe consists of a specific oligonucleotide that targets micrococcal nuclease (MN), a nuclease derived from Staphylococcus aureus. The oligonucleotide is flanked by a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) at one end, and by a dendron functionalized with several gadolinium complexes as enhancers, at the other end. Therefore, only upon recognition of the MRI probe by the specific bacteria is the probe activated and the MRI signal can be detected. This approach may be widely applied to detect bacterial infections or other human conditions with the potential to be translated into the clinic as an activatable contrast agent.

Department/s

  • Diabetes and Brain Function
  • EXODIAB: Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • WCMM-Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine

Publishing year

2021

Language

English

Pages

7353-7362

Publication/Series

Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

Volume

413

Issue

30

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Springer

Topic

  • Other Medical Engineering

Keywords

  • Activatable MRI contrast agents
  • Bacteria
  • Detection system
  • MRI
  • Nucleases
  • Nucleic acid probes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Diabetes and Brain Function

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1618-2642