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Jan Nilsson

Professor

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Recombinant human antibodies against aldehyde-modified apolipoprotein B-100 peptide sequences inhibit atherosclerosis

Author

  • Alexandru Schiopu
  • J Bengtsson
  • Ingrid Söderberg
  • Sabina Janciauskiene
  • Stefan Lindgren
  • Mikko Ares
  • PK Shah
  • R Carlsson
  • Jan Nilsson
  • Gunilla Nordin Fredrikson

Summary, in English

Background-Accumulation and oxidation of LDL are believed to be important initiating factors in atherosclerosis. Oxidized LDL is recognized by the immune system, and animal studies have suggested that these immune responses have a protective effect against atherosclerosis. Aldehyde-modified peptide sequences in apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) are major targets for these immune responses. Methods and Results-Human IgG1 antibodies against 2 malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified apoB-100 peptide sequences were produced through screening of a single-chain antibody-fragment library and subsequent cloning into a pcDNA3 vector. Three weekly doses of these antibodies were injected into male apoE(-/-) mice. Phosphate-buffered saline and human IgG1 antibodies against fluorescein isothiocyanate were used as controls. One of the IgG1 antibodies significantly and dose-dependently reduced the extent of atherosclerosis as well as the plaque content of oxidized LDL epitopes and macrophages. In cell culture studies, human monocytes were incubated with native LDL or oxidized LDL, in the presence of antibodies. The same antibody induced an increase in monocyte binding and uptake of oxidized LDL. Conclusions-These findings suggest that antibodies are important mediators of atheroprotective immune responses directed to oxidized LDL. Thus, passive immunization against MDA-modified apoB-100 peptide sequences may represent a novel therapeutic approach for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

Department/s

  • Cardiovascular Research - Immunity and Atherosclerosis
  • Chronic Inflammatory and Degenerative Diseases Research Unit

Publishing year

2004

Language

English

Pages

2047-2052

Publication/Series

Circulation

Volume

110

Issue

14

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Topic

  • Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems

Keywords

  • apolipoproteins
  • immune system
  • antibodies
  • atherosclerosis
  • plaque

Status

Published

Research group

  • Cardiovascular Research - Immunity and Atherosclerosis
  • Chronic Inflammatory and Degenerative Diseases Research Unit

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1524-4539