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Isabel Goncalves

Professor

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Human Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression Is Dependent on Apoptosis According to Bomb-Pulse 14C Dating

Author

  • Andreas Edsfeldt
  • Kristina Eriksson Stenström
  • Jiangming Sun
  • Nuno Dias
  • Göran Skog
  • Pratibha Singh
  • Sören Mattsson
  • Jan Nilsson
  • Isabel Gonçalves

Summary, in English

Individuals with rapidly progressing atherosclerotic plaques are at higher risk of experiencing acute complications. Currently, we lack knowledge regarding factors in human plaque that cause rapid progression. Using the 14C bomb-pulse dating method, we assessed the physical age of atherosclerotic plaques and which biological processes were associated with rapidly progressing plaques. Interestingly, increased apoptosis was the main component associated with a young physical plaque age, reflecting rapid plaque progression. Our findings in combination with recent advances in imaging techniques could guide future diagnostic imaging strategies to identify rapidly progressing plaques or therapeutic targets, halting plaque progression.

Department/s

  • Cardiovascular Research - Translational Studies
  • EXODIAB: Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • Nuclear physics
  • MERGE: ModElling the Regional and Global Earth system
  • Vascular Diseases - Clinical Research
  • Quaternary Sciences
  • Medical Radiation Physics, Malmö
  • Cardiovascular Research - Immunity and Atherosclerosis
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2021

Language

English

Pages

734-745

Publication/Series

JACC: Basic to Translational Science

Volume

6

Issue

9-10

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Elsevier

Topic

  • Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems

Status

Published

Research group

  • Cardiovascular Research - Translational Studies
  • Vascular Diseases - Clinical Research
  • Medical Radiation Physics, Malmö
  • Cardiovascular Research - Immunity and Atherosclerosis

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 2452-302X