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Erik Renström

Erik Renström

Vice-chancellor

Erik Renström

Temperature-Sensitive Random Insulin Granule Diffusion is a Prerequisite for Recruiting Granules for Release.

Author

  • Rosita Ivarsson
  • Stefanie Obermüller
  • Guy A Rutter
  • Juris Galvanovskis
  • Erik Renström

Summary, in English

Glucose-evoked insulin secretion exhibits a biphasic time course and is associated with accelerated intracellular granule movement. We combined live confocal imaging of EGFP-labelled insulin granules with capacitance measurements of exocytosis in clonal INS-1 cells to explore the relation between distinct random and directed modes of insulin granule movement, as well as exocytotic capacity. Reducing the temperature from 34 °C to 24 °C caused a dramatic 81% drop in the frequency of directed events, but reduced directed velocities by a mere 25%. The much stronger temperature sensitivity of the frequency of directed events (estimated energy of activation ~ 135 kJ/mol) than that of the granule velocities (~ 22 kJ/mol) suggests that cooling-induced suppression of insulin granule movement is attributable to factors other than reduced motor protein adenosine 5'-triphosphatase activity. Indeed, cooling suppresses random granule diffusion by ~ 50%. In the single cell, the number of directed events depends on the extent of granule diffusion. Finally, single-cell exocytosis exhibits a biphasic pattern corresponding to that observed in vivo, and only the component reflecting 2nd phase insulin secretion is affected by cooling. We conclude that random diffusive movement is a prerequisite for directed insulin granule transport and for the recruitment of insulin granules released during 2nd phase insulin secretion.

Department/s

  • Diabetes - Islet Patophysiology
  • Islet cell physiology

Publishing year

2004

Language

English

Pages

750-762

Publication/Series

Traffic: the International Journal of Intracellular Transport

Volume

5

Issue

10

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Diabetes - Islet Patophysiology
  • Islet cell physiology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1398-9219