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Eero Lindholm

Associate professor

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Common variants in CNDP1 and CNDP2, and risk of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes.

Author

  • Tarun Ahluwalia
  • Eero Lindholm
  • Leif Groop

Summary, in English

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Several genome-wide linkage studies have shown an association between diabetic nephropathy and a locus on chromosome 18q harbouring two carnosinase genes, CNDP1 and CNDP2. Carnosinase degrades carnosine (β-alanyl-L-: histidine), which has been ascribed a renal protective effect as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species. We investigated the putative associations of genetic variants in CNDP1 and CNDP2 with diabetic nephropathy (defined either as micro- or macroalbuminuria) and estimated GFR in type 2 diabetic patients from Sweden. METHODS: We genotyped nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one trinucleotide repeat polymorphism (D18S880, five to seven leucine repeats) in CNDP1 and CNDP2 in a case-control set-up including 4,888 unrelated type 2 diabetic patients (with and without nephropathy) from Sweden (Scania Diabetes Registry). RESULTS: Two SNPs, rs2346061 in CNDP1 and rs7577 in CNDP2, were associated with an increased risk of diabetic nephropathy (rs2346061 p = 5.07 × 10(-4); rs7577 p = 0.021). The latter was also associated with estimated GFR (β = -0.037, p = 0.014), particularly in women. A haplotype including these SNPs (C-C-G) was associated with a threefold increased risk of diabetic nephropathy (OR 2.98, 95% CI 2.43-3.67, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: These data suggest that common variants in CNDP1 and CNDP2 play a role in susceptibility to kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Department/s

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden

Publishing year

2011

Language

English

Pages

2295-2302

Publication/Series

Diabetologia

Volume

54

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Springer

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1432-0428