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Eero Lindholm

Associate professor

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Worse glycaemic control in LADA patients than in those with type 2 diabetes, despite a longer time on insulin therapy.

Author

  • Caroline Andersen
  • Louise Bennet
  • L Nyström
  • Ulf Lindblad
  • Eero Lindholm
  • Leif Groop
  • O Rolandsson

Summary, in English

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Our aim was to study whether glycaemic control differs between individuals with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and patients with type 2 diabetes, and whether it is influenced by time on insulin therapy. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 372 patients with LADA (205 men and 167 women; median age 54 years, range 35-80 years) from Swedish cohorts from Skåne (n = 272) and Västerbotten (n = 100). Age- and sex-matched patients with type 2 diabetes were included as controls. Data on the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHAs), insulin and insulin-OHA combination therapy was retrieved from the medical records. Poor glycaemic control was defined as HbA(1c) ≥7.0% (≥53 mmol/mol) at follow-up. RESULTS: The individuals with LADA and with type 2 diabetes were followed for an average of 107 months. LADA patients were leaner than type 2 diabetes patients at diagnosis (BMI 27.7 vs 31.0 kg/m(2); p < 0.001) and follow-up (BMI 27.9 vs 30.2 kg/m(2); p < 0.001). Patients with LADA had been treated with insulin for longer than those with type 2 diabetes (53.3 vs 28.8 months; p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the patient groups with regard to poor glycaemic control at diagnosis, but more patients with LADA (67.8%) than type 2 diabetes patients (53.0%; p < 0.001) had poor glycaemic control at follow-up. Patients with LADA had worse glycaemic control at follow-up compared with participants with type 2 diabetes (OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.7), adjusted for age at diagnosis, HbA(1c), BMI at diagnosis, follow-up time and duration of insulin treatment. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Individuals with LADA have worse glycaemic control than patients with type 2 diabetes despite a longer time on insulin therapy.

Department/s

  • Community Medicine
  • Family Medicine and Community Medicine
  • Family Medicine, Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Lifestyle
  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2012

Language

English

Publication/Series

Diabetologia

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Springer

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Status

Published

Research group

  • Community Medicine
  • Family Medicine and Community Medicine
  • Family Medicine, Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Lifestyle
  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1432-0428