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Big data and complex traits: a smorgasbord of opportunities and applications

CRC-seminars
Peter Visscher is one of the world’s leading statistical geneticists. Born in The Netherlands to Dutch and English parents, he moved to Edinburgh in 1987 for an MSc and subsequent PhD in animal breeding and genetics, working on the estimation of genetic parameters in large livestock pedigrees. A postdoctoral period in Melbourne was followed by a return to Edinburgh, where he developed methods to map genetic loci underlying complex traits. In 1995 he joined the faculty at the University of Edinburgh, developing gene mapping methods and software tools, with practical applications in livestock and human populations. Visscher joined the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in 2005 and in 2011 moved to the University of Queensland where he is Professor and Chair of Quantitative Genetics. Visscher is a Senior Principal Research Fellow of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2010. Visscher’s research interests are focused on a better understanding of genetic variation for complex traits, including quantitative traits and disease.*

Speaker: Professor Peter Visscher, program in complex trait genomics, Queensland, Brain Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Host: Paul Franks

 

Visscher’s key works include the development and application of methods to estimate SNP-based heritability 1,2,3, genetic architecture3, and gene-environment interactions4,5 in complex traits, amongst other major contributions.

 

Key reading:

 

  1. Yang J, Lee SH, Goddard ME, Visscher PM. GCTA: a tool for genome-wide complex trait analysis. Am J Hum Genet. 2011 Jan 7;88(1):76-82.
  2. Yang J, Zeng J, Goddard ME, Wray NR, Visscher PM. Concepts, estimation and interpretation of SNP-based heritability. Nat Genet. 2017 Aug 30;49(9):1304-1310
  3. Yang J, et al.  Genetic variance estimation with imputed variants finds negligible missing heritability for human height and body mass index. Nat Genet. 2015 Oct;47(10):1114-20.
  4. Yang J, et al. FTO genotype is associated with phenotypic variability of body mass index. Nature. 2012 Oct 11;490(7419):267-72

Robinson MR, et al. Genotype-covariate interaction effects and the heritability of adult body mass index. Nat Genet. 2017 Aug;49(8):1174-1181

 

 

Time: 
11 June 2018 13:00 to 14:00
Location: 
Agardh lecture hall, CRC, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SUS Malmö
Contact: 
pernilla.siming [at] med.lu.se

About the event

Time: 
11 June 2018 13:00 to 14:00
Location: 
Agardh lecture hall, CRC, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SUS Malmö
Contact: 
pernilla.siming [at] med.lu.se

Lund University Diabetes Centre, CRC, SUS Malmö, Entrance 72, House 91:12. SE-205 02 Malmö. Telephone: +46 40 39 10 00