Your browser has javascript turned off or blocked. This will lead to some parts of our website to not work properly or at all. Turn on javascript for best performance.

The browser you are using is not supported by this website. All versions of Internet Explorer are no longer supported, either by us or Microsoft (read more here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/windows/end-of-ie-support).

Please use a modern browser to fully experience our website, such as the newest versions of Edge, Chrome, Firefox or Safari etc.

Default user image.

Corrado Cilio

Professor

Default user image.

Quality of life in children and adolescents with respiratory allergy, assessed with a generic and disease specific instrument.

Author

  • Hampus Kiotseridis
  • Corrado Cilio
  • Leif Bjermer
  • Magnus Aurivillius
  • Helene Jacobsson
  • Aslög Dahl
  • Alf Tunsäter

Summary, in English

Introduction:

Respiratory allergic disorders like rhinitis and asthma are common conditions that not only affect target organs, but complicate the daily life of affected children and adolescents.



Objectives:

The aim of this study was to investigate the QoL (Quality of Life) in children with grass pollen allergy in and out of grass pollen season.



Methods:

We used the Pediatric Allergic Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PADQLQ), a disease specific questionnaire including both asthma and rhinitis symptoms. We also used the DISABKIDS questionnaire, a generic questionnaire covering non-organ specific effects of disease.



Results:

98 children 7-18 years old with grass pollen allergy were included. 89 children (91%) completed the study. The QoL was significantly decreased during pollen season assessed both with DISABKIDS and PADQLQ. The correlation between the questionnaires was 0.73. Not only the physical domain score (p=0.00093) but also the emotional domain score (p=0.034) was significantly lowered. Children with multiple manifestations (asthma and rhinitis) had lower QoL than children with rhinitis alone (p= 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed a highly significant impact on QoL for symptoms from nose, eyes and lungs. They were equally important (standardized coefficient 047, 0.47 and 0.46 respectively).



Conclusion:

The quality of life in children and adolescents with respiratory allergy deteriorates during pollen season. This was shown both with generic (DISABKIDS) and disease specific instrument (PADQLQ). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Department/s

  • Respiratory Medicine and Allergology
  • Diabetes - Immunovirology
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2013

Language

English

Pages

168-175

Publication/Series

Clinical Respiratory Journal

Volume

7

Issue

2

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Topic

  • Respiratory Medicine and Allergy

Status

Published

Research group

  • Diabetes - Immunovirology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1752-6981