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Cecilia Holm

Professor

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Evaluation of Beneficial Metabolic Effects of Berries in High-Fat Fed C57BL/6J Mice.

Author

  • Lovisa Heyman
  • Ulrika Axling
  • Narda Blanco
  • Olov Sterner
  • Cecilia Holm
  • Karin Berger

Summary, in English

Objective. The aim of the study was to screen eight species of berries for their ability to prevent obesity and metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes. Methods. C57BL/6J mice were assigned the following diets for 13 weeks: low-fat diet, high-fat diet or high-fat diet supplemented (20%) with lingonberry, blackcurrant, bilberry, raspberry, açai, crowberry, prune or blackberry. Results. The groups receiving a high-fat diet supplemented with lingonberries, blackcurrants, raspberries or bilberries gained less weight and had lower fasting insulin levels than the control group receiving high-fat diet without berries. Lingonberries, and also blackcurrants and bilberries, significantly decreased body fat content, hepatic lipid accumulation, and plasma levels of the inflammatory marker PAI-1, as well as mediated positive effects on glucose homeostasis. The group receiving açai displayed increased weight gain and developed large, steatotic livers. Quercetin glycosides were detected in the lingonberry and the blackcurrant diets. Conclusion. Lingonberries were shown to fully or partially prevent the detrimental metabolic effects induced by high-fat diet. Blackcurrants and bilberries had similar properties, but to a lower degree. We propose that the beneficial metabolic effects of lingonberries could be useful in preventing obesity and related disorders.

Department/s

  • Molecular Endocrinology
  • Molecular Nutrition
  • Insulin Signal Transduction
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden

Publishing year

2014

Language

English

Publication/Series

Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

Volume

2014

Issue

Jan 14

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Hindawi Limited

Topic

  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Status

Published

Project

  • ANTIDIABETIC FOOD CENTRE

Research group

  • Molecular Endocrinology
  • Molecular Nutrition
  • Insulin Signal Transduction

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 2090-0724