Your browser has javascript turned off or blocked. This will lead to some parts of our website to not work properly or at all. Turn on javascript for best performance.

The browser you are using is not supported by this website. All versions of Internet Explorer are no longer supported, either by us or Microsoft (read more here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/windows/end-of-ie-support).

Please use a modern browser to fully experience our website, such as the newest versions of Edge, Chrome, Firefox or Safari etc.

Default user image.

Cecilia Holm

Professor

Default user image.

A low glycaemic diet improves oral glucose tolerance but has no effect on β-cell function in C57BL/6J mice.

Author

  • Ulrika Axling
  • Liza Rosén
  • Nils Wierup
  • Elin Östman
  • Inger Björck
  • Cecilia Holm

Summary, in English

AIM: Clinical studies have suggested a role for dietary glycaemic index (GI) in body weight regulation and diabetes risk. Here, we investigated the long-term metabolic effects of low and high glycaemic diets using the C57BL/6J mouse model. METHODS: Female C57BL/6J mice were fed low or high glycaemic starch in either low-fat or medium-fat diets for 22 weeks. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed to investigate the effect of the experimental diets on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. RESULTS: In this study, a high glycaemic diet resulted in impaired oral glucose tolerance compared to a low glycaemic diet. This effect was more pronounced in the group fed a medium-fat diet, suggesting that a lower dietary fat content ameliorates the negative effect of a high glycaemic diet. No effect on body weight or body fat content was observed in either a low-fat diet or a medium-fat diet. Static incubation of isolated islets did not show any differences in basal (3.3 mM glucose) or glucose-stimulated (8.6 and 16.7 mM glucose) insulin secretion between mice fed a low or high glycaemic diet. CONCLUSION: Together, our data suggest that the impaired glucose tolerance seen after a high glycaemic diet is not explained by altered β-cell function.

Department/s

  • Molecular Endocrinology
  • Department of Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition
  • Department of Experimental Medical Science
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden

Publishing year

2010

Language

English

Pages

976-982

Publication/Series

Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

Volume

12

Issue

11

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Keywords

  • body composition
  • beta-cell
  • glycaemic control

Status

Published

Project

  • ANTIDIABETIC FOOD CENTRE

Research group

  • Molecular Endocrinology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1462-8902