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Carin Andrén Aronsson

Head of unit

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Sources of dietary gluten in the first two years of life and associations with celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease in Swedish genetically predisosed children: : TEDDY study

Author

  • Elin M Hård af Segerstad
  • Xiang Liu
  • Ulla Uusitalo
  • Daniel Agardh
  • Carin Andrén Aronsson

Summary, in English

Background
High gluten intake is associated with increased risk of celiac disease (CD) in children at genetic risk.

Objectives
To investigate if different dietary gluten sources up to age two years confer different risks of celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) and CD in children at genetic risk.

Design
Three-day food records were collected at age six, nine, 12, 18 and 24 months from 2088 Swedish genetically at-risk children participating in a 15-year follow-up cohort study on type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Screening for celiac disease was performed with tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). The primary outcome was CDA, defined as persistent tTGA positivity. The secondary outcome was CD, defined as having a biopsy showing Marsh score ≥ 2 or an averaged tTGA level ≥ 100 Units. Cox regression adjusted for total gluten intake estimated hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for daily intake of gluten sources.

Results
During follow-up, 487 (23.3%) children developed CDA, and 242 (11.6%) developed CD. Daily intake of ≤158 g porridge at age nine months was associated with increased risk of CDA (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.05, 2.23, P = 0.026). A high daily bread intake (>18.3 g) at age 12 months was associated with increased risk of both CDA (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.05, 2.05, P = 0.023) and CD (HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.10, 2.91, P = 0.019). At age 18 months, milk cereal drink was associated with an increased risk of CD (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.00, 1.33, P = 0.047) per 200 g/day increased intake. No association was found for other gluten sources up to age 24 months and risk of CDA or CD.

Conclusions
A high daily intake of bread at age 12 months and milk cereal drink during the second year in life is associated with increased risk of both celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease in genetically at-risk children.

Department/s

  • Celiac Disease and Diabetes Unit
  • EXODIAB: Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden
  • EpiHealth: Epidemiology for Health

Publishing year

2022

Language

English

Publication/Series

The American journal of clinical nutrition

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Topic

  • Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • Pediatrics

Status

Published

Research group

  • Celiac Disease and Diabetes Unit

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 0002-9165