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Andreas Lindqvist

Andreas Lindqvist

Research engineer

Andreas Lindqvist

Thylakoids suppress appetite by increasing cholecystokinin resulting in lower food intake and body weight in high-fat fed mice.

Author

  • Rickard Köhnke
  • Andreas Lindqvist
  • Nathanael Göransson
  • Sinan Cem Emek
  • Per-Åke Albertsson
  • Jens F Rehfeld
  • Anna Hultgårdh
  • Charlotte Erlanson-Albertsson

Summary, in English

Thylakoids are membranes isolated from plant chloroplasts which have previously been shown to inhibit pancreatic lipase/colipase catalysed hydrolysis of fat in vitro and induce short-term satiety in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to examine if dietary supplementation of thylakoids could affect food intake and body weight during long-term feeding in mice. Female apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were fed a high-fat diet containing 41% of fat by energy with and without thylakoids for 100 days. Mice fed the thylakoid-enriched diet had suppressed food intake, body weight gain and body fat compared with the high-fat fed control mice. Reduced serum glucose, serum triglyceride and serum free fatty acid levels were found in the thylakoid-treated animals. The satiety hormone cholecystokinin was elevated, suggesting this hormone mediates satiety. Leptin levels were reduced, reflecting a decreased fat mass. There was no sign of desensitization in the animals treated with thylakoids. The results suggest that thylakoids are useful to suppress appetite and body weight gain when supplemented to a high-fat food during long-term feeding. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Department/s

  • Appetite Regulation
  • Biochemistry and Structural Biology
  • Vessel Wall Biology

Publishing year

2009

Language

English

Pages

1778-1783

Publication/Series

Phytotherapy Research

Volume

23

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

John Wiley and Sons

Topic

  • Pharmacology and Toxicology

Status

Published

Research group

  • Appetite Regulation
  • Vessel Wall Biology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1099-1573