Your browser has javascript turned off or blocked. This will lead to some parts of our website to not work properly or at all. Turn on javascript for best performance.

The browser you are using is not supported by this website. All versions of Internet Explorer are no longer supported, either by us or Microsoft (read more here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/windows/end-of-ie-support).

Please use a modern browser to fully experience our website, such as the newest versions of Edge, Chrome, Firefox or Safari etc.

Default user image.

Anders Rosengren

Postdoctoral research fellow

Default user image.

Education immigration and income as risk factors for hemoglobin a1c >70 mmol/mol when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes in adult : A population-based cohort study

Author

  • Mats Martinell
  • Ronnie Pingel
  • Johan Hallqvist
  • Mozhgan Dorkhan
  • Leif Groop
  • Anders Rosengren
  • Petter Storm
  • Jan Stålhammar

Summary, in English

Objectives The aim of this research is to study education, income and immigration as risk factors for high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (8.6%)) when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA). Research design and methods Patients were included from the All New Diabetics in Scania study (2008-2013). Level of education, disposable income and immigration year were retrieved from the longitudinal integrated database for labour market research (LISA) register compiled by Statistics Sweden. Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (8.6%) at diagnosis. Results A total of 3794 patients with incident T2D (n=3 525) or LADA (n=269) were included. Patients with T2D with a low (≤9 years) or medium (10-12 years) levels of education were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with patients with T2D with a high (>12 years) level of education (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.08 to1.66, OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54). Low-income patients with T2D (<60% of median) were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with high-income patients withT2D (>150% of median) (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.79). Conclusions Patients with lower levels of education or low income and are more likely to have HbA1c is >70 mmol/ mol (8.6%) when diagnosed with T2D. An understanding of how socioeconomic position influences the clinical presentation at diagnosis may facilitate screening programs designed to target populations at risk for delayed diagnosis.

Department/s

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology
  • Diabetes - Islet Patophysiology
  • EXODIAB: Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden

Publishing year

2017-05-01

Language

English

Publication/Series

BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care

Volume

5

Issue

1

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

BMJ Publishing Group

Topic

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes
  • Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Status

Published

Research group

  • Genomics, Diabetes and Endocrinology
  • Diabetes - Islet Patophysiology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 2052-4897