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Biobreeding rat islets exhibit reduced antioxidative defense and N-acetyl cysteine treatment delays type 1 diabetes

Author:
  • Marika Bogdani
  • Angela M. Henschel
  • Sanjay Kansra
  • Jessica M. Fuller
  • Rhonda Geoffrey
  • Shuang Jia
  • Mary L. Kaldunski
  • Scott Pavletich
  • Simon Prosser
  • Yi-Guang Chen
  • Åke Lernmark
  • Martin J. Hessner
Publishing year: 2013
Language: English
Pages: 111-123
Publication/Series: Journal of Endocrinology
Volume: 216
Issue: 2
Document type: Journal article
Publisher: Society for Endocrinology

Abstract english

Islet-level oxidative stress has been proposed as a trigger for type 1 diabetes (T1D), and release of cytokines by infiltrating immune cells further elevates reactive oxygen species (ROS), exacerbating beta cell duress. To identify genes/mechanisms involved with diabeto-genesis at the beta cell level, gene expression profiling and targeted follow-up studies were used to investigate islet activity in the biobreeding (BB) rat. Forty-day-old spontaneously diabetic lymphopenic BB DRlyp/lyp rats (before T cell insulitis) as well as nondiabetic BB DR+/+ rats, nondiabetic but lymphopenic F344lyp/lyp rats, and healthy Fischer (F344) rats were examined. Gene expression profiles of BB rat islets were highly distinct from F344 islets and under-expressed numerous genes involved in ROS metabolism, including glutathione S-transferase (GST) family members (Gstm2, Gstm4, Gstm7, Gstt1, Gstp1, and Gstk1), superoxide dismutases (Sod2 and Sod3), peroxidases, and peroxiredoxins. This pattern of under-expression was not observed in brain, liver, or muscle. Compared with F344 rats, BB rat pancreata exhibited lower GST protein levels, while plasma GST activity was found significantly lower in BB rats. Systemic administration of the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine to DRlyp/lyp rats altered abundances of peripheral eosinophils, reduced severity of insulitis, and significantly delayed but did not prevent diabetes onset. We find evidence of b cell dysfunction in BB rats independent of T1D progression, which includes lower expression of genes related to antioxidative defense mechanisms during the pre-onset period that may contribute to overall T1D susceptibility.

Keywords

  • Endocrinology and Diabetes

Other

Published
  • Diabetes and Celiac Unit
  • ISSN: 1479-6805
E-mail: ake [dot] lernmark [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

Principal investigator

Diabetes and Celiac Unit

+46 40 39 19 01

+46 70 616 47 79

60:11:015

Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Malmö

33

Lund University Diabetes Centre, CRC, SUS Malmö, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, House 91:12. SE-214 28 Malmö. Telephone: +46 40 39 10 00