Your browser has javascript turned off or blocked. This will lead to some parts of our website to not work properly or at all. Turn on javascript for best performance.

The browser you are using is not supported by this website. All versions of Internet Explorer are no longer supported, either by us or Microsoft (read more here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/windows/end-of-ie-support).

Please use a modern browser to fully experience our website, such as the newest versions of Edge, Chrome, Firefox or Safari etc.

Default user image.

Åke Lernmark

Principal investigator

Default user image.

Identification of Non-HLA Genes Associated with Celiac Disease and Country-Specific Differences in a Large, International Pediatric Cohort

Author

  • Ashok Sharma
  • Xiang Liu
  • David Hadley
  • William Hagopian
  • Edwin Liu
  • Wei-Min Chen
  • Suna Onengut-Gumuscu
  • Ville Simell
  • Marian Rewers
  • Anette-G Ziegler
  • Åke Lernmark
  • Olli Simell
  • Jorma Toppari
  • Jeffrey P Krischer
  • Beena Akolkar
  • Stephen S Rich
  • Daniel Agardh
  • Jin-Xiong She

Summary, in English

OBJECTIVES: There are significant geographical differences in the prevalence and incidence of celiac disease that cannot be explained by HLA alone. More than 40 loci outside of the HLA region have been associated with celiac disease. We investigated the roles of these non-HLA genes in the development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) and celiac disease in a large international prospective cohort study.

METHODS: A total of 424,788 newborns from the US and European general populations and first-degree relatives with type 1 diabetes were screened for specific HLA genotypes. Of these, 21,589 carried 1 of the 9 HLA genotypes associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes and celiac disease; we followed 8676 of the children in a 15 y prospective follow-up study. Genotype analyses were performed on 6010 children using the Illumina ImmunoChip. Levels of tTGA were measured in serum samples using radio-ligand binding assays; diagnoses of celiac disease were made based on persistent detection of tTGA and biopsy analysis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards analyses.

RESULTS: We found 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 genes associated with celiac disease (TAGAP, IL18R1, RGS21, PLEK, and CCR9) in time to celiac disease analyses (10-4>P>5.8x10-6). The hazard ratios (HR) for the SNPs with the smallest P values in each region were 1.59, 1.45, 2.23, 2.64, and 1.40, respectively. Outside of regions previously associated with celiac disease, we identified 10 SNPs in 8 regions that could also be associated with the disease (P<10-4). A SNP near PKIA (rs117128341, P = 6.5x10-8, HR = 2.8) and a SNP near PFKFB3 (rs117139146, P<2.8x10-7, HR = 4.9) reached the genome-wide association threshold in subjects from Sweden. Analyses of time to detection of tTGA identified 29 SNPs in 2 regions previously associated with celiac disease (CTLA4, P = 1.3x10-6, HR = 0.76 and LPP, P = 2.8x10-5, HR = .80) and 6 SNPs in 5 regions not previously associated with celiac disease (P<10-4); non-HLA genes are therefore involved in development of tTGA.

CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, using a genetic analysis of a large international cohort of children, we associated celiac disease development with 5 non-HLA regions previously associated with the disease and 8 regions not previously associated with celiac disease. We identified 5 regions associated with development of tTGA. Two loci associated with celiac disease progression reached a genome-wide association threshold in subjects from Sweden.

Department/s

  • Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö
  • Diabetes and Celiac Unit
  • EXODIAB: Excellence in Diabetes Research in Sweden

Publishing year

2016

Language

English

Pages

0152476-0152476

Publication/Series

PLoS ONE

Volume

11

Issue

3

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Public Library of Science

Topic

  • Medical Genetics

Status

Published

Research group

  • Diabetes and Celiac Unit

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1932-6203